#CreativeUprising Q&A: Thobile Chittenden of Room13

#CreativeUprising Q&A: Thobile Chittenden of Room13

Over the next few days in the lead-up to the ACT | UJ Creative Conference, we will be posting several op-eds from our ACT Team members as well as the conference presenters & performers. This will allow the delegates to interact with some of the key themes and ideas around this year’s #CreativeUprising. Today’s Op-Ed Q&A comes from Thobile Chittenden from Room13,  catch her in conversation with Motsumi Makene on Thursday 27th July 2017 where she will be looking at the role of the community in creativity amidst the 4th Industrial Revolution.      THE ARTS & CULTURE TRUST (ACT): Please briefly describe the work that you are involved in? THOBILE CHITTENDEN (TC): I run a social marketing company that is passionate about uplifting youth and families, a not-for-profit that specialises in educational and behavioural change programmes. Through face-to-face interaction and on–the-ground intervention, we aim to create a sense of individual responsibility. We believe in creating shared value for our clients and the power of collaboration and innovation. Our vision is to make meaningful, measurable and magical differences in the lives and fortunes of disadvantaged youth. ACT: Why do you feel that creativity and the creative economy are essential for South Africa?  TC: I’m sure most people are aware of Africa’s youth bulge; 60% of the workforce in Africa is under 30 years old and it is critical that South Africa turns its fast-growing young population into a dividend rather than a burden. Education and training for future skills is a vital part of realising this potential. We are also very aware of the challenge we face in terms of youth unemployment. The root of unemployment is not only a lack of jobs; but a key...

Conferences Post Mortem | #CreativesMakeItHappen

Creatives can engage further with industry professionals on industry hot topics and opportunities by booking in time to join the #CreativesMakeItHappen conversation. 21 May: Conferences Post Mortem ACT Trustee, Jayesperi Moopen, engages the National Arts Council’s Coordinator, Rosie Katz from the NEPAD arts education conference and Levinia Jones, Head of Arts British Council and Content Director for the 2015 ACT | UJ Conference, around major observations, outcomes and ways forward with a focus on how practitioners can mobilise the knowledge and information shared at the conferences. Entrance to the conversation is free but space is limited. To secure your place, please email your contact details to preciousm@uj.ac.za and how many people you would like to book for. The 2015 Conference was presented by the Arts & Culture Trust (ACT), UJ Arts & Culture and British Council Connect ZA, with support from the Department of Arts and Culture, Business and Arts South Africa (BASA), SAMRO Foundation, Pro Helvetia, the European Union, the SA–UK Seasons 2014 & 2015; and media partners Classicfeel magazine and UJFM...

Places to Eat in Joburg

FOOD: MELLVILLE Hell’s Kitchen 1920’s New York speakeasy glamour, easy jazz and epic rock music, and excellent food and drinks, Hell’s Kitchen is a get away from the trendy masses and a space to just be you. Live music on the weekends, a saloon-style menu, an impressive selection of wines, whiskeys, drinks and cocktails, and a secret poker room behind the bookcase to escape that one annoying friend. Details Shop 4, 7th Street Melville 072 478 2592 Open Tuesday to Sunday   Service Station They serve the prettiest drinks, pastries and cakes, but come for the service, the luxe breakfasts and superb coffees. For lunch, you could weigh salads and quiche offerings by the plate, or order from the blackboards. They sport more interesting stuff like turkey, cranberry and brie baguette; the cheese choice platter with preserves; porcini with parsley and lemon zest on bruschetta; or helplessly divine sorbets with flavours like rose. Details 53 Rustenburg Road Melville 0117261701 Open 7 days a week   The Ant Café The Ant Café is a charming, unpretentious cafe and pizzeria situated in Melville. They are known for their delicious, crispy pizzas and cosy fireplaces. They have a pizza special every Monday (R45-00) and a pasta special every Tuesday. Details 11 7th Street Melville 0764765671 Open 7 days a week   Catz Pyjamas Catz Pyjamas is situated in up-beat Melville, Johannesburg. From trendsetters to the informal, from insomniacs to the lethargic, from old to young, from contemporary to classical music, from the hungry to the drinkers, and from the adventurous to the faint hearted. Details Open 24 Hours, 7 Days a week...

Things to do around Joburg in March

Joburg inner city is full of exciting things to do and places to see. We’ve decided to take a look at the vibrant spots in and around Joburg city centre during the month of March, and have taken the liberty of creating a to do list for you, during your visit to the city of Jozi: CREATIVE GATHERINGS Anthill Why it’s amazing With ACT & NEPAD conference in the two weeks following 8 March, there are friends from Lesotho, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Madagascar, DRC and Mauritius in town, to meet and split bread with. Anthills are the spontaneous and sporadic gathering of Ants at meaningful moments. An initiative of Pro Helvetia Johannesburg, these gatherings are convened in relationship with a local artistic collective or organisation, somewhere in Southern Africa. They provide an opportunity for people that we work with across the region to share stories, trials, successes, contacts, and ideas. Details 8 March 2015, from 12 King Kong rooftop, 1st Floor 6 Verwey Street, New Doornfontein RSVP: rseethal@prohelvetia.org.za by Friday 27 February TOURS Maboneng Art Ride – R170 Why it’s amazing Explore Joburg on a bicycle powered, treasure hunt through the city streets. Over the past few years Maboneng Precinct has become the centre of urban regeneration: the buildings, streets and walls display more than 50 artworks from the local and international artists. Roa, Faith 47, Hannelie Coetzee — the district holds a unique collection of outstanding graffitis, murals and street art. Take in the spirit of the concrete jungle and embark on a cycling adventure with the Maboneng dwellers as your tour guides. Details Time 15.00 Duration 2 hours Meeting location 302 Fox Street, Curiocity Backpackers, Maboneng...

The creative economy

The creative economy. Wait – creative economy? What’s a creative economy? In fact, what’s a creative? In a place like Braamfontein, the word “creative” is typically thrown around as freely as an empty coffee cup. Never with a mention or hint at whether it’s an adjective or noun. Muttered under a breath of matter-of-fact optimism by some; and with an underwhelmed sigh or roll of the eyes by others, the term is broadly weighed down by the fact that it can be very difficult to define and often means different things to different people. “I’m a creative. You’re a creative. Everybody’s a creative!” Popular now in discourse more than ever, the idea of a creative often brings to mind a number of exhausted tropes and tired clichés such as the “starving artist” or “gluten-free gallery dweller” – as its personifications. Which is mischievously facetious when it comes to what human creativity actually entails, requires, represents, produces or even has the potential to bring about in terms of socio-economic improvement .“If you look under your seat right now, you’ll find a creative!” According to the British Council, governments all over the world are beginning to recognise and re-imagine the socio-economic potential that the trade of human creativity brings. They refer to this on their blog as a creative economy. Still not sure what that means? According to the British Council’s Creative Cities website, a creative economy is defined as the “crossroads at which the arts, culture, business and technology industries [of a society] collide,” continuing, “what unifies these activities is the fact that they all trade with creative assets in...

Dance Creatives in Conversation

This Thursday 26 February 2015 at 17:00, PJ Sabbagha will facilitate a conversation between Nadia Virasamy and Kieron Jina for the fourth in the series of free public engagements leading up to and flowing from the ACT | UJ Arts & Culture Conference 2015. Picture (from left to right): PJ Sabbagha, Nadia Virasamy and Kieron Jina Please note that this conversation will start and end slightly earlier than the usual times, to allow those interested in attend the opening of Dance Umbrella the same evening, to do so.  Sabbagha is a South African choreographer whose name has become synonymous with issue-based dance theatre and more specifically HIV and AIDS focused art. He is founding member and Artistic Director of The Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative (FATC) and the annual When Life Happens: HIV and AIDS Arts and Culture. Virasamy began her career in academia at UKZN and then at UniVen for two years. In 2013 she was appointed CEO of Moving Into Dance Mophatong, one of SA’s foremost dance training organisations with a premier professional contemporary African dance company. She also serves on the board of the Newtown Improvement District as well as Lesedi Music. Named one of the Mail and Guardian’s top 200 Young South Africans in 2012, Jina is UJ Arts & Culture newly appointed Associate Choreographer. In addition to his work as an independent dance practitioner, he is also a performance artist, dancer, teacher, facilitator, director, fashion designer/model, cinematographer and video editor. Creatives in Conversation takes place in the Upstairs Studio at the UJ Arts Centre on the Kingsway Campus. Please RSVP to Precious via email at preciousm@uj.ac.za....